Expert Review: Salomon QST 92 Skis · 2022

This review is my honest opinion of the skis, which I tested in April of 2022.

A man skiing down a run.

Photo courtesy of Theo G.

Published on

About this Review: This review is my honest opinion of the skis, which I tested in April of 2022. For information on the latest model of this ski, check out the 2023 Expert Review.

My take

The Salomon QST 92 Ski was the biggest surprise. I expected it to be forgiving, but I was surprised by its energy. The Salomon is a fantastic choice for intermediate to advanced skiers. Ideal for those who split their time between Western and Eastern ski areas and are at home on and off groomed terrain.

About the gear

  • Model: 2023 Salomon QST 92
  • Size: 185

About me

  • Height: 6’2”
  • Weight: 215 lbs
  • Experience: 45 years (on-and-off ski instructor for over 20 years)

Test conditions

  • When I tested these: April 2022
  • Days tested: 1
  • Mount position: On the line
  • Boots: 2017 Tecnica Mach1 LV 130
  • Boot Size: 27.5
  • Bindings: Salomon Demo bindings
  • Where I’ve used it: Powder Mountain Utah
  • Terrain: A mix of groomers, and off-piste skiing on firm refrozen snow and in a few inches for fresh snow

How they perform

Carving
4/5
Durability
5/5
Flotation
4/5
High Speed Stability
4/5
Turn Ease
5/5
Versatility
5/5

What I was looking for

I was expecting the QST to be forgiving, and it responded to a range of input. I could drive the ski and turn through the tips, or even keep a centered stance and turn through the body of the ski. The QST was light and snappy.

Why I chose this gear

Usually, when I test skis, my first task is to figure out what the ski likes to do and what it doesn’t like. Some skis with softer tips respond well to a centered stance; other, stiffer skis like to be driven through the nose. What amazed me about the QST was how well it responded to a range of inputs in various terrain. It doesn’t demand that I ski hard but responds when I do – this is incredibly rare.

A man skiing down a run at a ski resort.

What I love about it

  • Speed: I was expecting the QST 92 to be easy to turn, but I was very pleasantly surprised with how well it held an edge, and how stable it was as I increased my speed.
  • Edge hold: We tested skis in sub-optimal skiing conditions (we get that sometimes in April). At first, I was hesitant about overpowering the QST in firmer snow, but the QSTs held an edge like a dream.
  • Turns: The QSTs were tons of fun for making small to medium turns. I felt a ton of energy out of each turn for a 92 mm ski. And the while the skis aren’t noodles, I found it was easy to bend the ski into shorter turns or ride the turn radius for medium-sized turns. One of the easiest turning narrow all-mountain skis I’ve been on.
  • Groomers: I really enjoyed playing with different turn shapes and input styles on groomers, and the QST 92s responded every time. They are a great all-mountain ski for somebody who spends a fair amount of time, out of necessity or choice, on the mountain.
  • Trees: I did not get to ski these in the trees, but given how nimble and easy turning they were on and off-piste, I would not hesitate to take them tree skiing.
  • Moguls: For an all-mountain ski, I loved how these performed in the bumps. They were nimble, the edges released easily, and the somewhat softer tips and tails were forgiving of errors in firm conditions. Are they a ski for competition bump skiing? No. But they are a great all-mountain ski for someone who skis (or wants to learn to ski) in the bumps.
  • Backcountry: I did not get to ski these in the Backcountry, but at their weight and width they would make a solid 50/50 touring resort ski for an EC skier.
  • Weight: The QSTs are a capable and light ski.
  • Stability: I’ve skied damper skis, and I’ve skied more stable skis, and I would not characterize the QSTs as a super damp/stable ski, but I was very impressed with how stable they were for a light, forgiving ski. These would not be my first choice for a directional charger in variable conditions, but for an intermediate to advanced skier who is gaining confidence and wants to up their game, they are a great choice.

Issues I’ve encountered

  • Powder: I did not get to ski the QST 92s in deep powder, and at 92mm underfoot, I would not say that the QST is constructed as a powder ski. But for a ski that performs as well as it does on the groomers, I would expect the QST 92s to more than hold their own in boot-top powder.
  • Park: The QST 92 are not a dedicated park ski and I did not get to ski them in the park, but I would not hesitate to take these skis over jumps and the occasional box.
  • Durability: Because I only got to test the ski for one day, I cannot comment on its durability, but nothing that I saw or felt suggested that the QST 92 would lack durability.
  • Switch riding: The QSTs have a slightly upturned tail and a traditional mount spot – not the best ski for someone who rides switch 50% of the time. But I was very happy making a few backward turns from time to time (especially coming out of a 180).

Favorite moment with this gear

As I approached my first steep pitch on the QST 92s, I asked myself: “what’s going to happen if I try to drive these skis through aggressive short radius turns down the fall line? Will they hold an edge where I need it?” One-quarter of my way down the pitch, I had my answer; it was as if the skis were saying, “Bring it on!”

Value for the money vs. other options

I felt like the QST 92s were a fantastic value proposition in comparison to other versatile 90ish mm-waisted all-mountain skis like the K2 Mindbender 90ti, the Blizzard Ruslter 9, or the Volkl Kendo 88

Final verdict

The QST 92 has a high-performance ceiling for a ski that is so forgiving. A great choice for intermediate skiers looking to advance, or advanced to expert skiers looking to add a versatile ski to their quiver.

Selling Salomon on Curated.com
Salomon QST 92 Skis · 2022
Ski Expert Rob G.
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Rob G.
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Written By
I really, really love skiing. Whether hiking the bowl at Aspen Highlands, dropping off of the Cirque at Snowbird, or spending a day teaching lessons in the Catskills , I spend most of each winter and spring trying to maximize my time on snow. And if I'm not skiing, I'm probably talking about skiing...

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