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Expert Review: Callaway Rogue ST Pro Irons

Published on 04/24/2023 · 6 min readThis review is my honest opinion of the irons, which I tested for one day in August of 2022.
Billy Estes, Golf Expert
By Golf Expert Billy Estes

All photos courtesy of Billy Estes

About this Review: This review is my honest opinion of the irons, which I tested for one day in August of 2022.

My take

The Callaway Rogue St Pro iron set is a mid-handicap distance iron that has extra weighting in the perimeter to add ball speed to the clubhead and increase distance. I love the new face technology, as it had a good overall feel coming off the face. Overall, it is a club for those needing some distance, and a club where one can feel comfortable working the ball.

About the club I tested

  • Model: Callaway Rogue St Pro Iron
  • Loft setting: 7 iron at loft of 30.5
  • Shaft type: True Temper Elevate MPH 115
  • Shaft flex: X-stiff flex

About me

  • Average score: 72.3
  • Handicap: +3
  • Experience : Over 20 years of playing golf, with six years playing professionally
  • Right/Left-Handed: Left-handed
  • Typical ball flight: Low-to-mid draw stock shot
  • Golf ball used: Titleist Pro V1
  • Club swing speed: 118mph (driver)

Test conditions

  • Where I tested the club: Shingle Creek Golf Academy in Orlando, Florida
  • When I tested the club: August 2022
  • Days tested: One
  • Where I’ve used it: This club was used in a covered indoor-to-outdoor hitting bay with flightscope technology to track ball flight numbers
  • Weather and wind conditions: Early morning, sunny conditions

How they perform

Distance
5/5
Forgiveness
4/5
Launch
4/5
Workability
4/5
Feel
3/5
Sound
2/5

What I was looking for

I was really looking for a players club that did not necessarily play like one. This club does have a blade-type look, but when I put it down behind the ball I see a pretty thick top line for confidence and some offset that doesn't make me feel like I am playing with a butter knife. I wanted a club to recommend to the mid-handicap player to have confidence but also know that they will be gaining distance with this iron.

Why I chose to test this club

I wanted to test this club because of the added distance, but I never felt like I was hitting a high-handicapper, game improvement club. I still had all the ability to work the golf ball both ways—which surprised me. I compare this iron to the TaylorMade Stealth iron, as they are very similar in build and look; but I do feel that as one gets better, this iron will let them move the golf ball more to their liking.

What I love about it

  • Distance: I loved the distance I gained with this iron. For a club that looks like a “players” club, the distance category stands out here due to the steel, flash face cup technology from Callaway. The Rogue Pro irons have a very strong lofts to aid in that distance, but the weighting in the clubs still launches the ball very nicely.
  • Forgiveness: I was actually surprised at how forgiving this iron is for a mid handicapper. Looking at this iron, one may think of it as a players iron, but it does have a pretty thick top line for that look of forgiveness. With 48 grams of tungsten weighting in this club, it keeps the spin low to moderate—making it a tad difficult to really hit the ball largely off line.
  • Workability: High regards for the workability of this club. Usually with a mid-handicapper club, I never feel as though I can move it as much as I like from a blade iron. But I did not see that in this club
  • Shaft Performance: The True Temper Elevate shaft is a mid to low-launching shaft that is standard with the set. At 115 grams, a lighter shaft that can still provide a good trajectory.
  • Launch Angle: I was able to hit the higher shots and my shots had a good flight overall. With the 48 grams of tungsten weighting mentioned earlier, this is an area Callaway wanted to highlight to help with the strong lofts. A very easy, high to mid-launching iron set that will help those who need height to stop a golf ball.

Issues I’ve encountered

  • Feel: The feel of the club was lacking; there is not a very soft face or feeling at impact. It was a very muted feel that I didn't believe helped me to know whether I had hit it in the center of the face, heel, or toe. I like to have feedback on my iron shots, and with such a forgiving face, I think I need to find feedback in another place because the face really feels the same all over.
  • Sound: By it feeling a little harder off the face, the sound was a very muted, more solid sound and not that crispy click of a pure strike.
  • Aesthetic Appeal: The thick top line at address may be something a player likes, though it is not my favorite. But I do understand that it gives confidence to the mid handicapper
  • Spin: This iron is a medium to low-spinning iron, but I didn't see spin numbers drop too drastically. I usually spin my 7 iron with a Pro V1 at 6900–7100 rpm. I dropped down to 6500rpm with this iron. One may lose a little bit of spin here, but not too drastic that it would hurt stopping a golf ball and may reduce misses.

Best shot with this club

Right when I hit the first ball, I said, “wow that shot out like a cannon!” A very high, low-spinning shot that I could tell had a ton of speed. When I went to start to work the ball, I noticed it was a very straight ball flight—so I could have very little movement on the ball. For a player who has a miss, this club set could help reduce that. I added five yards of distance to my 7 iron and 5 iron when testing—although it did reduce my spin.

Value for the money vs. other options

For a mid handicapper looking to take their game to a higher level and learn about moving the ball in order to become an elite ball striker, I do see these as being worth the money. Yes, the Taylormade Stealth irons are about $100 cheaper, but I do think one will hit a wall with those irons—needing to upgrade sooner than later—as they progress in the game.

Final verdict

Overall, I recommend these irons for any player needing some extra distance without sacrificing the ability to work the ball. They have the forgiveness of a player improvement club but the workability of a high-end players club; to me, this is the best combo for the mid-handicap golfer. I really think Callaway has a secret weapon in the Rogue ST Pro iron, and I feel that this club should be in the majority of mid-handicappers’ golf bags.

These clubs are featured in the Best Callaway Irons. Check it out for more recommendations and reviews.

Callaway Rogue ST Pro Irons

$857.13$1,028.58
17% off
  • We price match
  • Returnable
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