Expert Review: 2021 Blizzard Rustler 9

Three of our experts took to the slopes to test out the 2021 Blizzard Rustler 9. Check out this article for their full reviews.

Can the 2021 Blizzard Rustler 9 truly do it all? We sent three Curated experts out on the slopes at Winter Park Resort, CO to test out the 2021 Rustler 9.

First things first. Our experts aren’t sponsored by brands and all of their reviews are unpaid and unbiased—that means these are Curated experts’ honest opinions.

Check out the video or read on to find out if they think this board lives up to the hype!

Meet the Reviewers

Jake Parker

  • Height: 6’2”
  • Weight: 200 lbs
  • Years Skiing: 20
  • Favorite Terrain: Backcountry

Matt Wood

  • Height: 5’9”
  • Weight: 170 lbs
  • Years Skiing: 21
  • Favorite Terrain: All-mountain jumps

Garrett Gimbel

  • Height: 6’1”
  • Weight: 160 lbs
  • Years Skiing: 20
  • Favorite Terrain: Chutes

Expert Review

Key Features

  • Quick turn initiation
  • Stability at speed

Technical Specs

  • Titanal laminate
  • Directional twin

Overall Impressions

Blizzard claims that the Rustler 9 is a one-ski quiver—a real, do-it-all ski for those looking for playful skiing, ripping groomers, and tackling versatile conditions. And all three experts more or less agree!

“This is a really great candidate for the title of one-ski quiver,” says expert Jake Parker. Particularly “if you live in a place that gets a little more snow, and you like going off the trail.” Expert Matt Wood also notes that while testing the Rustler 9, it was easy to initiate turns and “whip this thing around.”

All three experts also agreed that this is a solid ski with plenty of backbone. But it’s still playful thanks to the tip and tail rocker. Says Jake, “It’s really loose, very forgiving, you could smear turns really easily—but also it’s very solid underfoot.”

“I was worried that the tips would be too soft,” notes expert Garrett Gimbel, “but they’re actually not all that soft and when I really drove the tips hard, they didn’t fold, which I was very pleased about.”

Things to Consider

That metal under foot is great for skiers looking for some stability, but it does make the ski quite heavy. Jake is pretty clear: “If you do not like heavier skis, I would not recommend the Rustler 9.”

The Rustler 9 may also require a little extra skill when maneuvering through cruddier snow. Says Matt, “When you get going faster through chop and crud, it tends to get deflected, especially the tip and tail. Not that it can’t handle it—it can—but it requires a strong skier to really tame it. So if you’re the kind of person who likes to just point it straight down mogul fields, chop runs, then this is maybe not the best option for you, unless you like that playful ski feel.”

Overall, though, our experts agree that this is a great option for beginner or intermediate skiers, but still has the backbone to cater to more aggressive skiers looking to tackle harder conditions. Jake says that he typically recommends this ski to “someone who likes to play around a little more and likes smearing their turns, wants to go switch.” Sound like you? Then this might just be your next do-it-all ski.

A man in blue pants and a grey jacket jumps in skis

Summing It Up

What It’s Good For

  • Beginner and intermediate skiers
  • Initiating turns
  • Playful, but solid underfoot

What It’s Not Good For

  • Skiing straight down mogul fields and chop runs
  • Heavy

Not sure these skis are right for you? Chat with a Curated expert to learn more about the 2021 Blizzard Rustler 9 skis and get personalized recommendations!

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Written By
Skier, Climber, Biker, Rafter working on a Physics PhD I grew up skiing, whitewater rafting, and backpacking with my family in Southeast Idaho. Since I moved to Bozeman for school outdoor sports have become a huge part of my life. Although I have been skiing my whole life it wasn't until I started s...
I have been skiing since 2 years old, I grew up skiing in Colorado at Eldora Mountain Resort. There I joined the race team, where I learned to make proper turns. I persued racing until the age of 18 when I moved to Montana and began my career as a big mountain freeskier. I currently represent a numb...
I grew up skiing on the icy slopes of Vermont but only recently moved to the cool champaign powder of Colorado. Furthermore, I have been an outdoor education guide for three years and an outdoor retail associate for one year. I studied Wildlife Biology at Univeristy of Vermont where I was also an ou...

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